Boolean Operators Are Standing By

And/Or/Not

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Happy Open Access Week!

Happy Open Access Week!
Open Access Week, a global event now entering its eighth year, is an opportunity for the academic and research community to continue to learn about the potential benefits of Open Access, to share what they’ve learned with colleagues, and to help inspire wider participation in helping to make Open Access a new norm in scholarship and research.  “Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.  Open Access (OA) has the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship. Research funding agencies, academic institutions, researchers and scientists, teachers, students, and members of the general public are supporting a move towards Open Access in increasing numbers every year. Open Access Week is a key opportunity for all members of the community to take action to keep this momentum moving forward.
This year’s theme is Generation Open.  Learn more about why open access is important and see what events are happening near you!

Lots of people are getting involved, too:



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Just Links!

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The Madness Begins...

I’m a big fan of Halloween! What’s not to love? You get to dress up in costume and eat lots of candy! (And, no, you’re never too old.)

The kids had their first Halloween party of the year tonight, so I get to show off their costumes.


The party itself was pretty cool. The kids played Make a Mummy:


See the little girl in the pink dress? That’s Swicky’s new friend. See the kid with her, completely wrapped up? That’s Swicky.

See Coconut? No. That’s because he wasn’t interested in playing Make a Mummy. He was too busy playing football with the big boys.


After that, they all went in and watched Hotel Transylvania and ate popcorn. They also got treat bags full of stickers, pencils, and candy to bring home.

All in all, a good night.

Next up: Trunk or Treat!


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Busy Day...

In addition to everything else, I got certified in CPR/AED again. Hooray!

But now I’m tired, so this will be short.

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Spooktastic!


Kids get plenty of candy for Halloween! Why not give them something they’ll love, that they can enjoy for a long time, and that won’t rot their teeth?

(Okay, okay - give them some candy, too.)

This Halloween, join in the fun with All Hallows’ Read!

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It's Late, Nothing But Links...

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Happy Ada Lovelace Day!

Happy Ada Lovelace Day! 




Who Was Ada Lovelace?
The woman most often known as ‘Ada Lovelace’ was born Ada Gordon in 1815, sole child of the brief and tempestuous marriage of the erratic poet George Gordon, Lord Byron, and his mathematics-loving wife Annabella Milbanke.

Ada Lovelace, 1838

Fearing that Ada would inherit her father’s volatile ‘poetic’ temperament, her mother raised her under a strict regimen of science, logic, and mathematics. Ada herself from childhood had a fascination with machines– designing fanciful boats and steam flying machines, and poring over the diagrams of the new inventions of the Industrial Revolution that filled the scientific magazines of the time.
At the age of 19 she was married to an aristocrat, William King; when King was made Earl of Lovelace in 1838 his wife became Lady Ada King, Countess of Lovelace. She is generally called Ada Lovelace, which is a little incorrect but saves confusion! She had three children.
In 1833, Lovelace’s mentor, the scientist and polymath Mary Sommerville, introduced her to Charles Babbage, the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics who had already attained considerable celebrity for his visionary and perpetually unfinished plans for gigantic clockwork calculating machines. Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace both had somewhat unconventional personalities and became close and lifelong friends. Babbage described her as “that Enchantress who has thrown her magical spell around the most abstract of Sciences and has grasped it with a force which few masculine intellects could have exerted over it,” or an another occasion, as “The Enchantress of Numbers”.
The Analytical Engine
Lovelace was deeply intrigued by Babbage’s plans for a tremendously complicated device he called the Analytical Engine, which was to combine the array of adding gears of his earlier Difference Engine with an elaborate punchcard operating system. It was never built, but the design had all the essential elements of a modern computer.
In 1842 Lovelace translated a short article describing the Analytical Engine by the italian mathematician Luigi Menabrea, for publication in England. Babbage asked her to expand the article, “as she understood the machine so well”. The final article is over three times the length of the original and contains several early ‘computer programs,’ as well as strikingly prescient observations on the potential uses of the machine, including the manipulation of symbols and creation of music. Although Babbage and his assistants had sketched out programs for his engine before, Lovelace’s are the most elaborate and complete, and the first to be published; so she is often referred to as “the first computer programmer”. Babbage himself “spoke highly of her mathematical powers, and of her peculiar capability — higher he said than of any one he knew, to prepare the descriptions connected with his calculating machine.”
Ada Lovelace died of cancer at 36, a few short years after the publication of “Sketch of the Analytical Engine, with Notes from the Translator.”
The Analytical Engine remained a vision, until Lovelace’s notes became one of the critical documents to inspire Alan Turing’s work on the first modern computers in the 1940s. Her thwarted potential, and her passion and vision for technology, have made her a powerful symbol for modern women in technology.
-Source 

More links for Ada Lovelace Day:


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Not Much of a Post Tonight....

I’m playing D&D.

Enjoy the links, though!

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Happy Day of the Girl!


Empowerment of and investment in girls are key in breaking the cycle of discrimination and violence and in promoting and protecting the full and effective enjoyment of their human rights”
-United Nations Resolution 66/170
Learn more about Day of the Girl, and how you can help girls worldwide conquer problems with school dropout, illiteracy, sexual harassment at school, violence, forced marriage, and more.


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